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Targeting steroid sulphatase in resistant prostate cancer cells

Presented By
Prof. Allen C. Gao , University of California Davis, USA

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Conference
EAU 2020
Overexpression of steroid sulphatase (STS) in prostate cancer cells increased androgen synthesis and conferred resistance to enzalutamide. The complementary experimental approach –inhibiting STS– improved enzalutamide efficacy. These studies suggest that STS can drive prostate cancer and initiate resistance through alternative synthesis of androgen [1]. Prof. Allen C. Gao (University of California Davis, USA) presented the abstract that won the EAU20 Best Abstract Award Oncology. The hypothesis formed by Prof. Gao’s research team stemmed from the observation that despite anti-androgen therapy, serum steroid levels of precursors for androgen synthesis (dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate and dehydroepiandrosterone) remained high; notably, their catalysing enzyme STS was also highly overe...


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